J & J

J&J Auto Coudersport
J&J Auto Coudersport

Wednesday, October 31, 2012

11-9 Fish Fry Roulette Firehall


Tuesday, October 30, 2012

11-9 Sparks Of Literacy


Sunday, October 28, 2012

11-24 Accepting Vendors Holiday Bazaar

Saturday, October 27, 2012

11-3 Fall Bazaar United Methodist Church


11-3/4 Sinnemahoning State Park Sled Race


Thursday, October 25, 2012

10-31 Fall Festival Port Allegany


Monday, October 22, 2012

Traffic Accident At Rt. 555 & Grant Road

TRAFFIC ACCIDENT/PINNED
Address: ROUTE 555 and GRANT RD
City: BENEZETTE
Cross Streets: WINSLOW HILL RD * ENZ HOLLOW LN

Agency: BENNETTS VALLEY AMBULANCE;
ST MARYS AMB; CAMERON CO 16 FD; ELK COMPANY 5 FD
10/22/2012 9:46:58 PM

CAMERON 16 FD RECALLED; MEDIC RECALLED; REPORT PATIENT SELF EXTRICATED; REFUSING TRANSPORT

LIVE SCANNER ELK

Coudy Theatre 10-26

Playing Friday Thru Monday

Saturday, October 20, 2012

11-6 Vascular Screenings


Friday, October 19, 2012

10-23 All For Pink Dig A Cure


Thursday, October 18, 2012

10-27 Halloween Party Genesee


11-10 Veteran's Day Dinner


10-23 Spaghetti Dinner Oswayo Valley Senior Class


GAME COMMISSION DESIGNATES DISEASE MANAGEMENT AREA IN RESPONSE TO CWD CONFIRMATION ON DEER FARM IN ADAMS COUNTY

GAME COMMISSION DESIGNATES DISEASE MANAGEMENT AREA IN RESPONSE TO CWD CONFIRMATION ON DEER FARM IN ADAMS COUNTY
Deer feeding banned in DMA; check station established for hunters in DMA

HARRISBURG – In a continuing response to the recent confirmation of Pennsylvania’s first case of chronic wasting disease of a captive-born and raised deer on a farm in Adams County, Pennsylvania Game Commission Executive Director Carl G. Roe today issued an Executive Order outlining a disease management area (DMA), which carries special restrictions in relation to deer within the DMA. While a map has been posted on the Game Commission’s website, the boundaries of the DMA are described below, and encompass a nearly 600-square-mile area of Adams and York counties.

As soon as the CWD-infected captive deer was found, the Commonwealth’s CWD Interagency Task Force was initiated to address the threat of the disease to captive and wild deer and elk populations in the state.  Task force members include representatives from the departments of Agriculture, Environmental Protection and Health, the Pennsylvania Game Commission, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Geological Survey/Pennsylvania Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit and Penn State University/Cooperative Extension Offices.


The task force will carry out the response plan, which includes education and outreach with public meetings and minimizing risk factors through continued surveillance, testing and management.


“This Executive Order will enable the Game Commission and Task Force members to monitor the state’s wild deer population in the area surrounding where the CWD-infected farmed deer was found,” Roe said. “We are relying on hunters and others concerned about wildlife to work with us as we strive to manage this disease.”


As part of the Game Commission’s order, which is part of the response plan, Roe used emergency regulatory authority to set in place a variety of actions that will impact hunters. Namely:


1. Hunters within the DMA are prohibited from moving high-risk parts outside of the DMA.  High-risk cervid parts include: the head (including brain, tonsils, eyes and any lymph nodes); spinal cord/backbone; spleen; skull plate with attached antlers, if visible brain or spinal cord tissue is present; cape, if visible brain or spinal cord tissue is present; upper canine teeth, if root structure or other soft tissue is present; any object or article containing visible brain or spinal cord tissue; unfinished taxidermy mounts; and brain-tanned hides. Parts not considered high-risk include: meat, without the backbone; cleaned skull plate with attached antlers, if no visible brain or spinal cord tissue is present; tanned hide or raw hide with no visible brain or spinal cord tissue present; cape, if no visible brain or spinal cord tissue is present; upper canine teeth, if no root structure or other soft tissue is present; and finished taxidermy mounts. To accomplish this, the agency will contract with processors to be available at the check station to serve those hunters who plan to move their harvest outside of the DMA without taking high-risk parts with them.

2. Hunters who harvest a deer within the DMA during the two-week firearms deer season (Nov. 26-Dec. 8) are required to bring their deer to a mandatory check station so that samples can be collected for CWD testing. For those participating in any other deer season prior to or after the two-week firearms deer season within the DMA, bringing harvested deer to the check station is voluntary, but encouraged. Deer harvested outside of the DMA will not be eligible for testing at the check station; however, hunters may get their deer checked by the Department of Agriculture’s Veterinary Laboratory, for a fee, by calling 717-787-8808. The check station is the Game Commission maintenance building on State Game Land 249, 1070 Lake Meade Road, East Berlin, Adams County. GPS coordinates for the building are -77.07280 and 39.97018. The check station will begin operation from 8 a.m. until 8 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 18, through Tuesday, Oct. 23, except for Sunday, when the check station will be closed. Details about check station hours for the remainder of the early archery and the regular firearms deer season, as well as the late archery and flintlock seasons, will be announced at a later date. The benefit to the hunter is two-fold: the Game Commission will cover the cost of having the animal tested, and the hunter will be notified if the harvested deer is found to be infected with CWD.  The benefit to the agency is that it will be able to test a sufficient number of deer within the DMA without having to resort to culling deer simply for testing.

3. Hunters within the DMA are prohibited from using or possessing any cervid urine-based attractants. Such attractants cause deer to congregate in certain areas and increases the likelihood that CWD could spread if it is found in the wild.

Additionally, Roe noted that the order prohibits the rehabilitation of deer within the DMA, as those deer will be euthanized and tested for CWD. 


The order also prohibits the feeding of cervids, which causes deer to congregate in certain areas and increases the likelihood that CWD could spread if it is found in the wild.


Finally, those individuals with a menagerie permit from the Game Commission will be prohibited from transporting live deer into or out of the DMA, and no new menagerie permits will be issued for locations within the DMA.


The order does not impact cervid livestock operations, which are under the jurisdiction of the Department of Agriculture.


Roe reiterated that officials from the CWD Task Force, including the Game Commission and Department of Agriculture, will hold a public meeting at 7 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 17, in the Bermudian Springs High School auditorium, 7335 Carlisle Pike, York Springs, Adams County.  Staff from the two agencies will provide background information on CWD, offer an update about deer farming operations and discuss the potential management challenges should CWD be found in wild deer populations.


As noted previously, the physical boundaries of the DMA are: Starting at the intersection of Interstate-76 and the west bank of the Susquehanna River heading south along the River (21.8 miles) to US Highway 30.  Westbound on US Highway 30 (18.3 miles) to Highway 116. Highway 116 towards Hanover (13.7 miles). In Hanover, southwest on State Highway 194 (7 miles) to Littlestown, then northwest on State Highway 97 (9.7 miles) to Gettysburg.  In Gettysburg, north on State Highway 34 (14.3 miles) to the Idaville Road. East on Idaville Road (4.8 miles) to the intersection of State Highway 94.  North State Highway 94 (2 miles) to Latimore Road. East on Latimore Road (1.6 miles) to Mountain Road. North on Mountain Road (6.9 miles) to Dillsburg and the intersection of US Highway 15.  North on US Highway 15 (3.2 miles) to the Yellow Breeches Creek (County Line).  Northeast along the banks of the Yellow Breeches Creek (12.1 miles) to the intersection of I-76.  East along I-76 (6.4 miles) to the intersection of the west bank of Susquehanna River and the starting point.


On Oct. 11, the Department of Agriculture announced that the positive sample was taken from a captive-born and raised white-tailed deer at 1491 New Chester Rd., New Oxford, and tested as part of Pennsylvania’s intensive CWD monitoring efforts. The sample tissue was tested at the Pennsylvania Veterinary Laboratory in Harrisburg and verified at the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa.


In addition to the Adams County location, the Department of Agriculture has quarantined three other farms directly associated with the positive deer at 6464 Jacks Hollow Rd., Williamsport, Lycoming County; 61 Pickett Rd., Dover, York County; and 295 Bremer Rd., Dover, York County. The quarantine prevents movement of any CWD susceptible animals on and off the premises.


CWD attacks the brains of infected deer, elk and moose, producing small lesions that eventually result in death. It is transmitted by direct animal-to-animal contact through saliva, feces and urine.


Signs of the disease include weight loss, excessive salivation, increased drinking and urination, and abnormal behavior such as stumbling, trembling and depression. Infected deer and elk may also allow unusually close approach by humans or natural predators. The disease is fatal and there is no known treatment or vaccine.


CWD was first discovered in Colorado captive mule deer in 1967, and has since been detected in 21 other states and two Canadian provinces, including Pennsylvania’s neighboring states of New York, West Virginia and Maryland. Pennsylvania is the 22nd state to find CWD in a captive or wild deer population and the 13th state to have it only in a captive deer herd.


Surveillance for CWD has been ongoing in Pennsylvania since 1998. The Agriculture Department coordinates a mandatory CWD monitoring program for more than 23,000 captive deer on 1,100 breeding farms, hobby farms and shooting preserves.


In addition, the Game Commission collects samples from hunter-harvested deer and elk and those that appear sick or behave abnormally. Since 1998, the Game Commission has submitted for testing more than 38,000 free-ranging deer and elk for CWD, and all have tested negative.


For more information from the departments of Agriculture and Health and the Pennsylvania Game Commission, visit:


* www.agriculture.state.pa.us (click on the “Chronic Wasting Disease Information” button on the homepage),

* www.pgc.state.pa.us (click on “CWD Info”), and

* www.health.state.pa.us (click on “Diseases and Conditions”).

Wednesday, October 17, 2012

10-19 Spaghetti Dinner At Pennyork Camp


11-1/2/3 Rummage Sale


10-26 Shinglehouse Halloween Party


Click to enlarge

11-3 Shinglehouse Annual Ham & Turkey Party


10-21 Shake 'EM To Save 'EM


10-27 Halloween Hay Ride


Click To Enlarge

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

11-3 Benefit For Gene Johnson


10-20 Vintage Vibes


Monday, October 15, 2012

10-20 Team Haiti Spaghetti Dinner


Fall Open House Boys & Girls Clubs


11-3 Harvest Supper


Thursday, October 11, 2012

The Oswayo Valley Senior Class Of 2013


Wednesday, October 10, 2012

Flaming Foliage Festival Starts Friday In Renovo

RENOVO -Thirty young women are in the running to become queen of 64th Flaming Foliage Festival.
The contestants and the schools they represent are:
AUSTIN AREA
Representing Austin Area High School is Racheal Ann Glover. Born on November 25, 1994, she is the daughter of Carey Little and Joe Glover, of Austin.
She has four siblings -Mercedes, Halie, Brian and Joseph. Racheal plays basketball, volleyball and softball, sings in the chorus and belongs to the Yearbook and Yellow Ribbon clubs. She also enjoys hunting, fishing, riding four-wheelers and hanging out with family and friends. After graduation Racheal plans to attend college to become an Ultra Sound Technician. Her escort for the weekend is Michael Valent, of Austin.
BALD EAGLE
Representing Bald Eagle Area High School is Emily Ann Chambers. Born on November 22, 1994, she is the daughter of Tammy Hibbler and Cliff Chambers, of Snow Shoe. She has a sister, Ellie, and a brothers, Zach. Emily is a member of the National Honor Society, FBLA, Yearbook Bookends, Student Government, Junior Executive Committee, Special Olympics Committee, Drama Club, and SADD. She also enjoys reading, writing, kayaking, jogging, fishing and camping. After graduation Emily plans to go to attend Penn State University and enroll in their Division of Undergraduate Studies program. Her escort for the weekend is Zachary Strunk.
BELLEFONTE
Representing Bellefonte Area High School is Chamberly Marie Corman. Born on September 3, 1995, she is the daughter of Jamie and the late Rodney Corman, of Bellefonte. She has a sister Alexa and a brother Ethan. Chamberlyn is a member of FBLA, Student Council, Key Club, Class Cabinet and is a varsity cheerleader. She also enjoys Wildcat All-State cheerleading, coaching youth cheerleading, reading and socializing with friends. After graduation Chamberlyn plans to attend Penn State to double major in Marketing and Public Relations. Her escort for the weekend is Chandler Ross, of Bellefonte.
BUCKTAIL
Representing Bucktail Area High School is Emily Leigh Shearer. Born on February 14, 1995, she is the daughter of Barbara and Thomas Shearer. She has three sisters; Erica, Alicia and Hannah. Emily is a member of the National Honor Society, Student Council, Interact Club, Environmental Club, Varsity Club, Art Club, Class President, and also plays basketball. She also enjoys spending time with family and friends, hunting, fishing, swimming and shopping. After graduation Emily plans to attend college. Her escort for the weekend is Brian Long.
CAMERON COUNTY
Representing Cameron County High School lis Abby Dean Etchepare. Born on September 22, 1994, she is the daughter of Kerry and Michael Etchepare, of Emporium. She has a brother Paul who is 16. Abby is a member of the National Honor Society, Art Honor Society, Student Body-President, Student Council, Yearbook Co-Editor, FBLA, Mock Trial, plays golf, basketball and softball and is in the CCHS band front. She also enjoys lifeguarding, reading, traveling, healthy cooking, gardening and volunteering at her church and at the local nursing home. After graduation Abby plans to attend a four-year university majoring in Dietetics/Nutrition with focus on athletics. Her escort for the weekend is Spencer Brown, of Emporium.
CANTON
Representing Canton Jr.-Sr. High School is Kaylin Nicole Baker. Born on May 24, 1995, she is the daughter of Courtney and Bill Baker, of Roaring Branch. he has a sister, Kristin, and brother, Dustin. Kaylin is a member of SADD, and plays on the softball and volleyball teams. She also enjoys hunting, fishing, playing volleyball and softball and supporting other school sports. After graduation Kaylin plans to attend Mansfield University to study Radiology Ultrasound Technician. Her escort for the weekend is Jacob Miller, of Canton.
CENTRAL MOUNTAIN
Representing Central Mountain High School is Kara Elizabeth Heckman. Born on May 26, 1995, she is the daughter of Melinda and Scott Heckman, of Mill Hall. She has two sisters, Kendra and Krista. Kara is a member of the National Honor Society, Student Council, Fellowship of Christian Athletes and plays on the soccer, basketball and track teams. She also enjoys drawing, painting and running. After graduation Kara plans to pursue a career as an Occupational Therapist. Her escort for the weekend is Cole Renninger, of Lock Haven.
DuBOIS
Representing DuBois Area High School is Gwen Floranell Michaux. Born on December 9, 1994, she is the daughter, of Gwen and Joe Michaux of DuBois. She has seven siblings; Rose, Danielle, Nick, Zack, Josue, Dennis and Darrell. Gwen is a member of the National Honor Society, Ark of Learning and Robotics Club. She also enjoys keeping stats for soccer, and spending time with family and friends. After graduation Gwen plans to continue her education and travel the world. Dominick David, of DuBois will be her escort for the weekend.
HUGHESVILLE
Representing Hughesville Area High School is Kayla Josephine Russell. Born on July 19, 1995, she is the daughter of Tammy and Jim Russell, of Hughesville. Kayla is a member of the National Honor Society, Varsity Club, Youth Group, Big Buddy, Christian Club, SADD, Student Council-Vice President and a cheerleader She also enjoys attending her church, art, spending time with family, poetry and reading classics. After graduation Kayla plans to attend college for Mortuary Sciences. Ty Stugart, of Hughesville will be her escort for the weekend.
JERSEY SHORE
Representing Jersey Shore Area High School is Victoria Annette Barrows. Born on January 10, 1995, she is the daughter, of Carol and Keith Barrows of Jersey Shore. She has two sisters, Susan and Rebecca. Victoria is a member of the National Honor Society, FBLA, concert choir, select choirs, marching band, Bible club, Model U.N., Constitutional Convention, and participates in school musicals. Victoria's hobbies include playing the piano, dancing, and singing, hiking and biking. After graduation she plans to attend college to study inter-cultural studies to become a missionary. Her escort for the weekend is Nathan Ulmer of Jersey Shore.
JOHNSONBURG
Representing Johnsonburg Area High School is Rhianon Jene Fowler. Born on December 22, 1994, she is the daughter of Joyce and Robert Fowler, of Wilcox. She has one sister, Shikara. Rhianon is a member of the National Honor Society, Stand Tall, prom committee, environmental club, student council secretary and class treasurer. Some of her hobbies include fishing, hunting, soccer, basketball, track, cheerleading, dance, gymnastics and knitting. After graduation Rhianon she to attend college to become a Physical Therapist. Her escort for the weekend is Caleb Helfright, of Johnsonburg.
LIBERTY
Representing Liberty Area High School is Deborah Esther Brown. Born on May 27, 1995, she is the daughter of Sally and Eric Brown, of Trout Run. She has a brother Jacob and a sister Rebekah. Deborah is a member of the National Honor Society, Key Club, FBLA, Spanish club, peer helpers, SAR, ski club, Battle of the Books, news crew, band and volleyball and track teams. She also enjoys scrapbooking, riding horses, baking, leather making and snowboarding. After graduation she plans to attend college and double major in special education and elementary education. Her escort for the weekend is Blaze Buckwalter, of McElhattan.
MANSFIELD
Representing Mansfield Area High School is Noelle Marie Payne. Born on November 12, 1994, she is the daughter, of Cyndi and Tim Payne of Mansfield. She has a sister, Marlena, and a brother, Tyler. Noelle is a member of the National Honor Society, Key Club, FBLA, Future Leaders of Tomorrow, sings in the chorus, plays in the band and is on the tennis team. She also enjoys horseback riding, playing the piano, playing tennis and jubilation. After graduation Noelle plans to attend college majoring in Equine studies. Her escort for the weekend is Justin Doud, of Mansfield.
MONTGOMERY
Representing Montgomery Area High School is Emily Mae Fisher. Born on July 21, 1995, she is the daughter of Hettie Mook and Rich Fisher, of Montgomery. She has a brother, Tyler. Emily is a member of SADD, Student Council, TSA, prom committee, concert cand,, science club and FBLA. She also likes dancing, photograph, theatre and singing. After graduation she plans to attend Pennsylvania College of Technology to become a Dental Hygienist. Her escort for the weekend is Jason Rutkoski, of Montgomery.
MONTOURSVILLE
Representing Montoursville Area High School is Autumn Elizabeth MacInnis. She is the daughter, of Crystal Hughes and Bill MacInnis, of Trout Run. She has two brothers, Ben and Mason. Paige is a member of the Key Club, prom committee, Radical Readers and plays on the tennis and track teams. She also enjoys running, tennis and photography. After graduation Autumn plans to attend Pennsylvania College of Technology for Culinary Arts. Her escort for the weekend is Nathan Flexer, of Williamsport.
MUNCY
Representing Muncy Jr./Sr. High School is Rebecca Ann Smith. Born on March 2, 1995, she is the daughter of Diane and Larry Smith, of Muncy. She has a brother, Robert, and a sister, Victoria. She is a member of the National Honor Society, FBLA, Key Club, SADD, foreign language club, art club and school newspaper. She also enjoys track and field, playing field hockey, lifting, writing, dancing, reading, listening to music and spending time with loved ones. After graduation She plans to attend a four-year college to major in speech pathology. Her escort for the weekend is Alexander Shull, of Pennsdale.
NORTH PENN
Representing North Penn High School Kathryn Baker. Born on June 10, 1995, she is the daughter of Lisa and Roy Baker, of Tioga. She has three siblings, Heather, Ashley and Jon. She is a member of the Key Club, and plays on the basketball team. She also enjoys playing basketball, listening to music and spending time with friends After graduation She plans to attend college to become an registered nurse. Her escort for the weekend is Clay Coolidge, of Mansfield.
OSWAYO VALLEY
Representing Oswayo Valley Jr. is Chloe Lynn Blauvelt. Born on December 13, 1994, she is the daughter of Barbara and Paul Blauvelt of Shinglehouse. She has a brother Mark and a sister Katharine. Chloe is a member of the National Honor Society, NRG, Band, Pep-Band, Chorus, and plays on the basketball and softball teams. She also enjoys hiking, horseback riding, camping, knitting, crocheting, photography and painting and drawing. After graduation Chloe plans to attend college for veterinary science and minor in photography. Her escort for the weekend is Tyler Edge, of Ashtabula, Ohio.
PENNS VALLEY
Representing Penns Valley High School is Sarah Jane Haas. Born on April 20, 1995, she is the daughter of Karen Shinskie and Erik Haas, of Spring Mills. She has a sister, Rachel. Sarah is a member of the National Honor Society, Academic Decathlon, Yearbook and plays soccer. She also enjoys reading, fishing, shopping and doing Sudoku puzzles. After graduation she plans to attend college. Her escort for the weekend is Matthew Hodgson, of Centre Hall.
PORT ALLEGANY
Representing Port Allegany High School is Sara Catherine Borro. Born on May 21, 1995, she is the daughter of Thrisa and Mike Borro, of Roulette. She has a sister, Nicole. She is a member of the National Honor Society, show choir, chorus, peer helping, French club, band and track team. Her hobbies include reading, skiing, doing crafts and kayaking with her family. After graduation she plans to attend the University of Pittsburgh and pursue a career in medicine. Her escort for the weekend is Logan Hutton, of Port Allegany.
SAINT JOHN NEUMANN
Representing St. John Neumann Regional Academy is Katherine Lynne Mertes. Born on January 10, 1995, she is the daughter of Lorraine and Fredrick Mertes, of Williamsport.. She has two sisters, Alexandra and Jennifer. Katherine is a member of the National Honor Society, student council and Leo Club. She also enjoys playing softball, basketball and soccer and hanging out with friends. After graduation she plans to attend college to major in athletic training, then continue her education to become a sports medicine doctor. Her escort for the weekend is Henry Rainey, of Jersey Shore.
SAINT MARYS
Representing Saint Marys Area High School is DeAnna Rae Yost. Born on November 26, 1994, she is the daughter of Carol Muhitch and Richard Yost, of St. Marys. She has two brothers, Nathan and Andy. She is a member of the ecology, adventure and ski clubs and plays on the basketball, volleyball and track teams. She also enjoys fishing with her father, listening to music and hanging out with friends. She plans to attend college to be a registered nurse. Gideon Woelfel, of Kersey, will be her escort for the weekend.
SMETHPORT
Representing Smethport Area High School is Jordan Maye Dickinson. Born on September 2, 1995, she is the daughter of Warrie and Robert Dickinson, of Smethport. She has a sister, Brenda.She is a member of the National Honor Society, peer helpers, show choir, co-president of the senior class, vice-president of student council and plays on the soccer team. She also enjoys baking, swimming and coaching swimming and walking her dog. After graduation she plans to attend college in the marine biology field. Her escort for the weekend is Jeramey Mason, of Smethport.
SOUTH WILLIAMSPORT
Representing South Williamsport Jr./Sr. High School is LouAnna Bragalone. Born on September 7, 1995, she is the daughter of Gemma and Dominick Bragalone, of DuBoistown. She has three siblings - Rose, Dominick and Sophia.. She is a member of the Key Club, FCCLA (vice-president), Relay for Life, Leo Club, Fight to End Childhood Hunger, Habitat for Humanity and plays on the track and tennis teams. She also enjoys traveling, shopping, swimming and being with family and friends. After graduation she plans attend college majoring in the medical field. Her escort for the weekend is Dominick Bragalone.
SUGAR VALLEY
Representing the Sugar Valley Rural Charter School is Tory Lynn Welch. Born on March 23, 1994, she is the daughter of Kim and Corey Welch, of Jersey Shore. She has a sister, Jana. She is a member of the year book club and is a manager for the wrestling team. She also enjoys baking, hunting, fishing and photography. After graduation She plans to attend college to become a nurse. Her escort for the weekend is Broderick Taylor, of Jersey Shore.
SULLIVAN COUNTY
Representing Sullivan County High School is Devin Lynn Strickland. Born on April 27, 1994, she is the daughter of Andrea and Kevin Tutorow, of Dushore. She has a brother, Stevie. She is a member of the National Honor Society, science club, FBLA, SADD, student government and Scholarship Challenge and is a cheerleader. She also enjoys volunteering at the SPCA, reading, writing, art work and running. After graduation she plans to attend college, get her doctorate in English and become a professor. Her escort for the weekend is Scotty Vandine, of Muncy Valley.
WARRIOR RUN
Representing Warrior Run Area High School is Jordyn Cheyanne Johnson. Born on March 7, 1995, she is the daughter of Beth Pfleegor and Jeffrey Johnson, of Allenwood. She has four siblings- Cailyn, Colten, Bryn and Vance. She is a member of the National Honor Society, student council, Spanish club, drama club, concert choir, Tri-Hi-Y, class historian and plays on the soccer and track teams. She also enjoys running, playing soccer, singing and camping. After graduation she plans to attend college to study psychology. Her escort for the weekend is Aaron Knopp, of Muncy.
WELLSBORO
Representing Wellsboro Area High School is Mackenzie Lauren Marple. Born on October 30, 1994, she is the daughter of Jill and Dan Marple, of Wellsboro. She has a brother, Nick, and a sister, Alexandra. She is a member of the National Honor Society, chorus, Connectors Plus and plays on the volleyball and track teams. She also enjoys reading, riding horses, swimming, photography, sports, and spending time with family and friends. After graduation she plans to attend college majoring in the physicians assistant program and playing volleyball. Her escort for the weekend is Benjamin Shaw, of Wellsboro.
WILLIAMSON
Representing Williamson Area High School is Brooke Lee Gottwald. Born on June 18, 1995, she is the daughter of Nancy and Joseph Gottwald of Millerton. She has three brothers - Joseph, Michael and Jameson. She is a member of student council, yearbook club, mock trial, robotics, chorus and is on the tennis and track teams. She also enjoys painting, playing tennis, volunteering with the Girl Scouts and spending time with family and friends. After graduation she plans to attend college for secondary education. Her escort for the weekend is Brandon Cain, of Millerton.
WILLIAMSPORT
Representing Williamsport Area High School is Olivia Rose Kuzio. Born on January 30, 1995, she is the daughter of Jennifer and Keith Kuzio, of Williamsport. She is a member of the National Honor Society, executive board, PMEA, choir, Les Chanteuses and plays on the tennis team. She also enjoys running, tennis and singing. After graduation she plans to attend college in the pharmaceutical field. Her escort for the weekend is Dante Miele-Elion, of Williamsport.
HOSTESSES
Madison Jo Gentzyel is senior at Bucktail Area High School and the daughter of Marcie and Kevin Gentzyel. She was born on September 5, 1995. After graduation she plans to attend Mansfield University to become a therapist.
Brenna Lynn Tripp is a senior at Bucktail Area High School and the daughter of Mary Tripp. After graduation Brenna plans to attend college majoring in English.
Jodie Alexis Dremelis is a senior at Bucktail Area High School and the daughter of Bonnie and Jim Dremel. After graduation she plans to attend Lock Haven University and dual major in early childhood and special education.
Kaitlyn Elise McCann is senior at Bucktail Area High School and the daughter of Heather James and John McCann. After graduation she plans to move to Boston and attend art school.
2013 LAUREL REP.
Haley Christine Francis is a senior at Bucktail Area High School and the daughter of Teresa and Jerry Francis. SAfter graduation Haley plans to attend college to become an Registered nurse.

10-24 Free ADD/ADHD Support Group


Tuesday, October 9, 2012

11-3/4 Friends of The Galeton Public Library


10-18 Ulysses Methodist Church Harvest Dinner


Monday, October 8, 2012

Luncheon & Baked Foods Sale Sunday In Crosby


10-11-12 Homegrown Heroes Oswayo Valley Library


Sunday, October 7, 2012

Haunted Clubhouse


Saturday, October 6, 2012

10-27 Lyman Run State Park Halloween Spooktacular


Friday, October 5, 2012

10-26 Adult Halloween Party St. Eulalia Parish


Wednesday, October 3, 2012

AVERAGE GROUSE HUNTING EXPECTED OVERALL

AVERAGE GROUSE HUNTING EXPECTED OVERALL
HARRISBURG – Pennsylvania Game Commission biologists expect ruffed grouse hunting to be average to slightly-below average for the nearly 100,000 hunters who annually pursue these challenging game birds.

“Conditions for over-wintering, incubating and brooding should have supported good reproduction this year,” said Lisa Williams, Game Commission grouse and woodcock biologist. “However, our Game Commission field staff observed fewer adult grouse and grouse broods this summer compared to prior years. Those sightings are often the best predictor of the season, so I advise hunters to hope for the best but keep their expectations realistic. Find areas of good dense cover and abundant food supply and you’ll put yourself in the best position for success.” 

The first segment of the state’s three-part grouse season opens Saturday, Oct. 13, and runs through Nov. 24. The season reopens Dec. 10 to 24, and then again from Dec. 26 to Jan. 26. Participating hunters must have a valid Pennsylvania hunting license and follow the regulations that govern this rugged sport of brush-busting and mountain-scampering. Wherever you hunt grouse, there is ample reason to carve out some time afield this season. Just be sure to take time to locate high-quality coverts that provide a good mix of food and cover.


“Losses of young forest habitat over the last several decades have been bad news for grouse, woodcock and other species that rely on these habitats,” said Ian Gregg, Game Commission Game Bird Section supervisor. “Our forests are getting older, and that’s a negative for grouse.  But, the good news is that the Game Commission is taking an active approach to improving the situation for grouse and other species that rely on young forests.  We have Grouse and Woodcock management plans that call for aggressive management of young forest habitats, and Game Commission staff in all regions are actively working to create suitable habitat – not only on State Game Lands, but on cooperating State Forests and other public and private lands. This work benefits multiple species and our efforts have received an overwhelmingly positive response from the public and from our conservation partners.”


Pennsylvania’s state bird is holding its own in areas of suitable habitat, and in some areas, thriving. Statewide, the Game Commission’s 314 active Grouse Cooperators hunted 7,787 hours and recorded 10,249 flushes for an average rate of 1.32 flushes per hour during the 2011-2012 grouse season. This 2011-2012 flush rate was equal to that of the previous season but six percent below the long term (46-year) average of 1.41 flushes per hour.  Embedded in those statewide averages, however, are memorable hunting experiences, with many hunters recording four to five flushes per hour in areas of good food and cover.


Williams noted that Pennsylvania consistently maintains the highest flush rates among nearby states such as Kentucky, Maryland, New York, New Jersey, Ohio, West Virginia and Virginia.


“Grouse flush trends in most of our neighboring states show a continuing long term decline,” Williams said. “Over the past six to seven years, Pennsylvania flush rates have exceeded those of all neighboring states. During that time, our grouse population index has stabilized in some regions that were previously declining, and even increased in some portions of the Commonwealth. Anecdotal reports from grouse hunters as well as agency land managers and foresters suggest that forest understory conditions have improved for grouse as deer numbers were brought back into balance with their forest habitats.  I intend to further investigate this link between deer impacts, forest habitat quality and grouse numbers.”


Grouse hunting remains a popular fall pursuit in Pennsylvania. According to the agency’s Game Take Survey, an estimated 80,000 hunters took 52,000 grouse during the 2011-12 seasons, during 350,000 days afield. Though fewer than in the past, grouse hunters remain passionate about their quarry, and the ruffed grouse remains a popular game bird in the Commonwealth. Yet grouse hunter numbers remain well below those of the mid-1980s when Pennsylvania had more than 400,000 hunters pursuing the thunderbird.


“Several hunters have told me they can hunt all day and not see another grouse hunter,” says Williams. “For hunters seeking a season with a little more elbow room yet plenty of challenge, you might want to consider grouse hunting.”


The Game Commission conducts a Summer Sighting Survey in which Game Commission foresters and surveyors record numbers of broods and individual grouse seen while working in the woods during June, July and August. Trends in hunters’ fall flush rates follow those of the summer survey about 80 percent of the time, so this information is used to develop the season forecast.


“Sightings of adult grouse during the summer of 2012 were down roughly 40 percent and brood sightings were down 25 percent compared to last year,” Williams said. “Looking a bit further back over time, observations of both adults and broods this summer are down 25 percent from the most recent 10- year averages. So in spite of what I believe was a good year for reproduction, I’m forecasting an average to slightly below-average grouse season in 2012-13. This makes it particularly important to understand the characteristics of good grouse habitat, locate high-quality coverts, and focus your efforts there.” 


Grouse and woodcock hunters are urged to participate in the Game Commission’s Grouse Cooperator Survey, which enables the agency to monitor long-term changes in grouse populations in good habitats. Hunters of all skill levels are welcome, no matter how many days they are able to devote to grouse or woodcock hunting. For each day hunted, participants are asked to record the county and number of hours hunted, and number of grouse and woodcock flushed and bagged.


Hunters interested in participating in the Cooperator Survey are asked to contact the Pennsylvania Game Commission, Bureau of Wildlife Management by calling 717-787-5529, or writing to: Pennsylvania Game Commission, ATTN: Grouse Cooperator Survey, 2001 Elmerton Ave., Harrisburg, PA 17110-9797. New Cooperators will receive a copy of the annual newsletter provided to all survey participants and all forms needed for the upcoming season.


“Though cooperator information is presented as state or region averages, it is important to remember that statewide trends do not apply equally throughout Pennsylvania,” Williams emphasized. She groups Pennsylvania regions into three categories, as far as grouse hunting prospects:


1) Northwest and Northcentral: good to excellent. These regions are consistently the top two in the state and have maintained grouse flush rates at or above their long-term averages in recent years. The rate of timber harvest over the next few decades in this part of Pennsylvania may put enough land into good grouse cover that the “good old days” are just ahead. The six contiguous counties of Warren, Forest, McKean, Potter, Elk, and Cameron typically have the highest flush rates in the state and offer plenty of acreage in public and open-access private lands for hunters looking for new coverts.

2) Southwest, Southcentral and Northeast: fair. These regions maintain intermediate flush rates and habitat conditions with somewhat less extensive overall forest cover and lower rates of active forest management at a large landscape scale.  From 2010-2011 to 2011-2012, flush rates increased slightly or remained stable in each of these regions.

3) Southeast: fair in areas north of the Blue Mountain and poor south of it. Large parcels of forest habitat in southeastern Pennsylvania were already scarce and this region has lost early successional habitat even more rapidly than the rest of the state. Consequently, grouse hunting opportunities in the agricultural and urban-dominated landscapes south of the Blue Mountain are extremely limited. Again, locating high-quality habitat is key and taking the time to scout for grouse food and cover hotspots prior to the season may pay dividends.

Grouse hunters are reminded to wear at least 250 square inches of fluorescent orange clothing on the head, chest and back combined at all times; limit hunting parties to no more than six individuals; and plug shotguns to three-shell capacity (magazine and chamber combined).

Open House


Tuesday, October 2, 2012

BBQ & Krispy Kreme Donuts


10-20 Halloween Party Ulysses Fire Hall


SQUIRRELS ABOUND IN PENNSYLVANIA’S FORESTS AND WOODLOTS

SQUIRRELS ABOUND INPENNSYLVANIA FORESTS AND WOODLOTS

If there’s one game animal that could use some additional attention in Pennsylvania, it’s squirrels, according to Pennsylvania Game Commission biologists. Squirrel season opens on Oct. 13, and runs through Nov. 24. The season reopens on Dec. 10-24, and Dec. 26-Feb. 23. The daily limit is six.


Squirrel populations have been enjoying the benefits of declining hunting pressure and the maturation of habitat in the state for some time. These factors have spurred fox squirrel range expansion and recovery. The calculated squirrel harvest has been relatively stable over the past seven years, ranging from 530,125 to 784,741. Last year, an estimated 690,141 squirrels were harvested by hunters.



“Gray squirrels are our most abundant game species and are found throughout Pennsylvania,” said Tom Hardisky, Game Commission biologist. “Look for mast-producing trees such as walnut, butternut, oak and hickory when searching for the best hunting areas. In agricultural areas, woodlots in the vicinity of standing cornfields often support large numbers of squirrels. They can be found throughout deep woods areas.”

Squirrel populations may be reduced in areas where last year’s mast crop failed or was extremely poor. Winter survival is largely determined by the available food supply cached by squirrels during the previous fall. If overwinter survival of females was poor and body condition of survivors weakened, squirrel numbers will likely be reduced this fall in those areas. Adult gray and fox squirrels older than 14 months can have two litters with two to three young each year under favorable food conditions. During food-stressed years, one litter is typical.

Annual food abundance and corresponding body condition of female squirrels are key factors limiting population growth.

Hardisky noted that the black squirrel is actually a color phase of the gray squirrel. In general, black squirrels can be found in the northern half of Pennsylvania. Squirrels with this black color variation often occur in local concentrations scattered about their northern Pennsylvania range.

“Fox squirrels are up to 50 percent larger than gray squirrels and weigh about two pounds,” Hardisky said. “Fox squirrels have been expanding their range eastward in recent years and now inhabit much of the western half of Pennsylvania. They prefer more open areas than gray squirrels and are not found in the deep woods. Fox squirrels favor open fields and pastures with large trees nearby. Small woodlots and forest edges are typical fox squirrel haunts.

“Although some gray squirrels may possess orange coloration along their sides and tails, fox and gray squirrels do not interbreed, nor do gray and red squirrels. Each squirrel species has some color variation, even within local populations. However, this color variation largely results from genetic differences. Local diet, habitat, and climate differences also may contribute to color variation.”

When hunting squirrels, Hardisky said hunters should look for large-trunked trees near a food source. Larger trees offer better protection from predators and are favorite den sites. Gray squirrels are most active during the early morning and evening, while fox squirrels often travel during mid-day.

Pennsylvania’s youth squirrel hunt is Oct. 6-12. The season is open to youths 12 to 16 years of age who have successfully completed a Hunter-Trapper Education course and are properly accompanied by an adult. A hunting license is not required to participate.

Hunters also are reminded that squirrels are listed as a game animal that can be pursued by youngsters participating in the Mentored Youth Hunting Program, which permits those under the age of 12 to hunt under the guidance of a mentor.

Squirrel hunters are required to wear at least 250 square inches of fluorescent orange clothing, visible 360 degrees, at all times.

Monday, October 1, 2012

11-3/4 Advanced ICS For Command And General Staff


10-12/13/14 Goodies For Our Troops